Thanks to the car’s technology, every deceleration or braking is an accumulation of energy, and when you gain speed on the trimaran, (the waves are like the curves of the mountains of Palma), "you have to fly low, almost above the water's surface - cries the Sailor - otherwise every hollow the boat hits is wasted energy".
In fact, as the wind picks up, the sea beneath the nets connecting the side hulls to the central hull runs at very high speed (you can see it under your feet) and when you get to thirty knots you have to start holding on. The wind enters between the sails and produces a continuous, deep whistle. Crew members shout directions to each other to stabilise and launch the boat, then cling to it to see if their maneuvres have produced speed, energy. Here, noise is life, is travel.

On the Maserati Ghibli, however, there is no noise. On the car body the wind produces no noise at all. The aerodynamics of the car are almost perfection, and if the absence of friction is a guarantee of energy conservation for both vehicles, if noise at sea is life, here silence becomes luxury. There is only the grit of the engine and the soft rolling of the tyres on the concrete: but whether you're at sea or on land, the time has come to unleash power.